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OVERSEAS CORPORATE VISITATIONS TO SILICON AND SALINAS VALLEY, U.S.A. (MIM-30)
Posted : 07/06/2017
OVERSEAS CORPORATE VISITATIONS TO SILICON AND SALINAS VALLEY, U.S.A. (MIM-30)
“Learning is experience.  Everything else is just information.” said Albert Einstein.  To turn information we received in classroom to a real learning, on April 23, 2017, twenty-two excited MIM-30 students started an exclusive business trip in San Francisco, the City by the Bay.  Our accommodation for the first three nights was at the Marriott, Union Square Hotel located in the middle of the city.  We spent our dinner time together at a famous steak restaurant in town having a brief discussion, setting the tone of this trip, and preparing ourselves to make sure we would learn the most out of it.
 
Our first day began at Salesforce, a CRM cloud computing and the fourth largest software company in the world.  At Salesforce, we learned that one important factor behind the success of the company was people.  Not only diverse and continuous training that the company invested in their people, there is also a culture called “Ohana”, which means "family", that Salesforce created for its staff, customers and communities.  In 2014, the company was ranked 7th out of Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work for, which consequently drew lots of talented people to drive the further success of the company.
 
The next visit was at WeWork, a fast-growing co-working and office space founded in 2010 and currently having 177 office locations in 47 cities in Americas, Europe and Asia.  The success of WeWork was driven by not only great locations, facilities and flexibility for startups, but also strong networks and community where creative ideas could be shared and generated.
 
We started our second day at the most famous social media platform provider with the largest user base in the world, Facebook.  Besides energetic people we met on campus, how Mark Zuckerberg kept motivating his people was very interesting.  One thing we learned was that Facebook’s headquarters used to belong to Sun Microsystems, a global network computing leader which was collapsed and acquired by Oracle in 2009.  Today, even though the entire place was made over, the sign of Sun at the entrance was not removed.  It was flipped over to the other side of Facebook logo as a reminder to Facebook people of what could happen when you are on the top but fail to keep innovating and moving fast.
 
We continued our learning at IngDan Experience Center, a showcase destination of various innovative ideas that were turned into real products such as smart home gadgets, VR, drones and etc.  IngDan Company is a one-stop service center for procurement and supply chain of electronic components linking entrepreneurs around the world to the sources of suppliers.
 
Huawei was our last destination of the day.  In Thailand, people recognized Huawei as a manufacturer of electronic devices such as mobile phone and tablet, which in fact was just only one part of the company’s business.  Huawei is a leading global player in telecommunications, providing various products and services such as IT infrastructure, cloud computing, wireless and fixed networks.  Even though the company is a leading player in global scale, it is still largely unknown in the U.S.  As a Chinese company, having a footprint in Silicon Valley was very significant.  We were amazed by the information shared by Huawei and the challenges they faced to prove themselves through R&D on technology and innovation to both B2B and B2C prospects in the U.S.
 
April 26, 2017 was our third day of the visit.  We were still very enthusiastic for our next visit at Google. Starting as an online search engine, today Google has introduced several innovative and powerful Internet-related services and products to the world. The company shared with us information and idea of a few forthcoming products of Google, namely WayMo (a self-driving car), Project Loon (a network balloon), and Google VR (Virtual Reality), and got a chance to try VR products of Google—i.e. Google Earth and Tilt Brush.  Not just for fun as it may seem for now, the development of VR provided a promising future to many industries such as communication, automobile and health care.  One of the secrets behind the success of Google is its talented people.  The company always hired “overqualified people”.  Why? So they use only 80% of their time to complete assigned tasks, and for the rest 20%, they can be spent on crunching innovative future ideas.
 
The last visit of the day was at Pebble Beach Company, a dream destination of every golfer.  Pebble Beach had hosted several golf tournaments, including PGA and LPGA tours. This five-star luxurious heritage hotel had a challenge to attract young-generation golfers as well as non-golfer customers. The strategy was to utilize all communication channels to reach out as much target customers as possible.  With a good research and data collection on the profile of audience in each channel, the company was able to tailor its communication message to match the needs and interests of each group of target audience.
 
Besides the famous Silicon Valley, on our last day of the visit, we had an opportunity to experience another powerful industry that drives the economy of California, which is agricultural business.  Driscoll’s, the world'slargest berries producer, was the first destination of the day.  We had a chance to walk into a strawberry field and see what actual operation looked like.  Moreover, it was much of our honor to have Brie Reiter Smith, the fourth-generation family member of Driscoll’s, sharing with us how the company built and maintained strong relationships with independent farmers as well as the secrets to naturally breed, grow and deliver the finest fresh berries to customers around the world.
 
The learning continued at Tanimura & Antle, one of the largest vegetable growers in California. We went into a field where harvesting, packing and delivery processes were taking place.  It was very exciting to see how human labors were integrated with technology to make sure operations run at its best efficiency, and all crops were delivered fresh from farm to stores.  We also had a chance to visit Western Grower Center, a center and association of western U.S. farmers where many agricultural technology, innovation and idea were initiated and shared to solve the problems of rising labor costs and labor deficiency in agricultural industry.
 
Having a chance to visit these global entities was a priceless once-in-a-life-time experience.  We would like to use this opportunity to express our sincere gratitude to Professor Dr. Shyam Kamath, Dean of the College of Business at California State University, Monterey Bay, for generously facilitating this memorable trip and connecting us to these world-class corporations.  We also would like to extend our sincere thanks to Ajarn L (Associate Professor  Pannapachr Itthiopassagul, MIM Program Director), Khun Jiu (Medhee Jarumaneeroj, MIM-14), Khun Pu (Wuthichai Luangamornlert, MIM-16), Khun Peace (Sirinadda Kaweewattana, MIM Program Manager) as well as everyone in MIM office who kindly dedicated their time and effort to make sure we would learn the most out of these great opportunities in every way.  Last but not least, thank you all MIM-30 friends for sharing together good learning experiences and some of the best moments during this MIM journey.
Juthamas Lertchuwongsa (MIM-30)
“Learning is experience.  Everything else is just information.” said Albert Einstein.  To turn information we received in classroom to a real learning, on April 23, 2017, twenty-two excited MIM-30 students started an exclusive business trip in San Francisco, the City by the Bay.  Our accommodation for the first three nights was at the Marriott, Union Square Hotel located in the middle of the city.  We spent our dinner time together at a famous steak restaurant in town having a brief discussion, setting the tone of this trip, and preparing ourselves to make sure we would learn the most out of it. 
 
Our first day began at Salesforce, a CRM cloud computing and the fourth largest software company in the world.  At Salesforce, we learned that one important factor behind the success of the company was people.  Not only diverse and continuous training that the company invested in their people, there is also a culture called “Ohana”, which means "family", that Salesforce created for its staff, customers and communities.  In 2014, the company was ranked 7th out of Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work for, which consequently drew lots of talented people to drive the further success of the company. 
 
The next visit was at WeWork, a fast-growing co-working and office space founded in 2010 and currently having 177 office locations in 47 cities in Americas, Europe and Asia.  The success of WeWork was driven by not only great locations, facilities and flexibility for startups, but also strong networks and community where creative ideas could be shared and generated. 
 
We started our second day at the most famous social media platform provider with the largest user base in the world, Facebook.  Besides energetic people we met on campus, how Mark Zuckerberg kept motivating his people was very interesting.  One thing we learned was that Facebook’s headquarters used to belong to Sun Microsystems, a global network computing leader which was collapsed and acquired by Oracle in 2009.  Today, even though the entire place was made over, the sign of Sun at the entrance was not removed.  It was flipped over to the other side of Facebook logo as a reminder to Facebook people of what could happen when you are on the top but fail to keep innovating and moving fast. 
 
We continued our learning at IngDan Experience Center, a showcase destination of various innovative ideas that were turned into real products such as smart home gadgets, VR, drones and etc.  IngDan Company is a one-stop service center for procurement and supply chain of electronic components linking entrepreneurs around the world to the sources of suppliers. 
 
Huawei was our last destination of the day.  In Thailand, people recognized Huawei as a manufacturer of electronic devices such as mobile phone and tablet, which in fact was just only one part of the company’s business.  Huawei is a leading global player in telecommunications, providing various products and services such as IT infrastructure, cloud computing, wireless and fixed networks.  Even though the company is a leading player in global scale, it is still largely unknown in the U.S.  As a Chinese company, having a footprint in Silicon Valley was very significant.  We were amazed by the information shared by Huawei and the challenges they faced to prove themselves through R&D on technology and innovation to both B2B and B2C prospects in the U.S. 
 
April 26, 2017 was our third day of the visit.  We were still very enthusiastic for our next visit at Google. Starting as an online search engine, today Google has introduced several innovative and powerful Internet-related services and products to the world. The company shared with us information and idea of a few forthcoming products of Google, namely WayMo (a self-driving car), Project Loon (a network balloon), and Google VR (Virtual Reality), and got a chance to try VR products of Google—i.e. Google Earth and Tilt Brush.  Not just for fun as it may seem for now, the development of VR provided a promising future to many industries such as communication, automobile and health care.  One of the secrets behind the success of Google is its talented people.  The company always hired “overqualified people”.  Why? So they use only 80% of their time to complete assigned tasks, and for the rest 20%, they can be spent on crunching innovative future ideas. 
 
The last visit of the day was at Pebble Beach Company, a dream destination of every golfer.  Pebble Beach had hosted several golf tournaments, including PGA and LPGA tours. This five-star luxurious heritage hotel had a challenge to attract young-generation golfers as well as non-golfer customers. The strategy was to utilize all communication channels to reach out as much target customers as possible.  With a good research and data collection on the profile of audience in each channel, the company was able to tailor its communication message to match the needs and interests of each group of target audience. 
 
Besides the famous Silicon Valley, on our last day of the visit, we had an opportunity to experience another powerful industry that drives the economy of California, which is agricultural business.  Driscoll’s, the world'slargest berries producer, was the first destination of the day.  We had a chance to walk into a strawberry field and see what actual operation looked like.  Moreover, it was much of our honor to have Brie Reiter Smith, the fourth-generation family member of Driscoll’s, sharing with us how the company built and maintained strong relationships with independent farmers as well as the secrets to naturally breed, grow and deliver the finest fresh berries to customers around the world. 
 
The learning continued at Tanimura & Antle, one of the largest vegetable growers in California. We went into a field where harvesting, packing and delivery processes were taking place.  It was very exciting to see how human labors were integrated with technology to make sure operations run at its best efficiency, and all crops were delivered fresh from farm to stores.  We also had a chance to visit Western Grower Center, a center and association of western U.S. farmers where many agricultural technology, innovation and idea were initiated and shared to solve the problems of rising labor costs and labor deficiency in agricultural industry. 
 
Having a chance to visit these global entities was a priceless once-in-a-life-time experience.  We would like to use this opportunity to express our sincere gratitude to Professor Dr. Shyam Kamath, Dean of the College of Business at California State University, Monterey Bay, for generously facilitating this memorable trip and connecting us to these world-class corporations.  We also would like to extend our sincere thanks to Ajarn L (Associate Professor  Pannapachr Itthiopassagul, MIM Program Director), Khun Jiu (Medhee Jarumaneeroj, MIM-14), Khun Pu (Wuthichai Luangamornlert, MIM-16), Khun Peace (Sirinadda Kaweewattana, MIM Program Manager) as well as everyone in MIM office who kindly dedicated their time and effort to make sure we would learn the most out of these great opportunities in every way.  Last but not least, thank you all MIM-30 friends for sharing together good learning experiences and some of the best moments during this MIM journey.

Juthamas Lertchuwongsa (MIM-30)

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An Interview with CNN by Krating Poonpol (MIM-14)
One of the most notable and successful MIM alumni who has jostled promising startups in Thailand should be no other man than Krating (Ruangroj) Poonpol.
During 12-26 September 2017, MIM-31 will be studying the first taught course in Trimester II MK 612: Statistics for Marketing Decisions which is another marketing-tool course and is compulsory in the MIM curriculum. 
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